Today's Article
When anyone insists
on censoring you,
they are doing it for
themselves, to
either grab power or
to maintain it.
The American Spark
Social Media Censors Are As Dangerous As Political Ones

By Cliff Montgomery - Aug. 31st, 2018

Everyone understands why it is important to keep government officials from deciding what you may say, see,
hear and read. An official who controls such things will surely end up controlling what you think and feel.
Everyone understands that it is the action of a tyrant.

But these days, government types aren’t the only ones who may employ such measures. Corporations like
Facebook, Twitter and YouTube - who often control our modern, computerized means of talking to one
another - have begun to censor our communications according to their personal biases.

All in the name of
serving the public, of course; the eternal rallying cry of all tyrants.

But let’s make this clear: When anyone insists on censoring the ideas, theories and images you express to
others, they are not doing it for you. They are not doing it for ‘decency’. They are censoring these things for
themselves, to either grab power or to maintain it.

And like all tyrants, their censorship soon proves to be arbitrary and ill-founded. The current corporate
attempt at censorship sometimes is performed in the name of weeding out the infamous ‘bots’ that,
according to many, destroyed Hillary Clinton’s inevitable and rightful coronation as our queen ... whoops, we
mean, as our
president.

The result? Our frightened Democratic-leaning social media corporations have been silencing  individuals
who openly disagree with the companies’ view of the world - particularly if those individuals post to the social
media sites often.

The accounts of the censored individuals were “suspended or frozen for ‘suspicious’ behavior — apparently
because of the frequency and relentlessness of their messages,” according to the
Associated Press (AP). Or
perhaps the censors can’t fathom that anyone except a (moderate) Democrat can ever be genuinely
enthusiastic about a political idea...

When these individuals “started tweeting support for a conservative lawmaker in the GOP primary for Illinois
governor this spring,”  added
AP, “news stories warned that right-wing ‘propaganda bots’ were trying to
influence the election.”

“Almost all of us are considered a bot,” Nina Tomasieski, a 70-year-old grandmother, told
AP.

Tomasieski “lives in Tennessee but is tweeting for GOP candidates across the U.S.,” stated
AP.

Cynthia Smith, another person who often posts to Twitter, “has been locked out of her account and ‘shadow
banned,’ meaning tweets aren’t as visible to others, because of suspected (i.e., presumed) ‘automated
behavior,’ ” continued
AP.

“I’m a gal in Southern California,” Smith told the wire service. “I am no bot.”

Recently, a number of social media sites also have placed a ban on the posts of conservative commentator
Alex Jones. No one has confused Mr. Jones with a ‘bot’. Those who run the social media sites simply don’t

like what he has to say, and so they decided to ban him.

This is not an attempt to stop some presumed ‘outside influence’ of our pretense to democracy. It is simply a
group of wealthy, powerful people banning someone’s statements because they disagree with him.

Now, the
American Spark is certainly no friend of Alex Jones or the often strange ideas he spouts. But we
believe that the old statement often attributed to French political thinker Voltaire remains the essence of a
free people:

    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

On Tuesday, the Spark will follow up this article with a number of quotes from the great George Orwell,
immortal writer of
1984 and Animal Farm. Mr. Orwell said a number of very interesting things about the
dangers of such corporate censorship. We feel that his statements on the matter are especially pertinent
today. And we believe you’ll feel the same way after you read Tuesday’s follow-up article.



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